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  •   Pet Health And Care >>  Dog Training >>  Protection dog training  
     

    Train Dogs to Guard You:

    Almost every dog breed is suitable for protection training.



    Although some people prefer purebreds over mixed breeds for personal protection, dog training is best when a dog that has been selectively bred and possesses the right temperament for training is chosen. Some important dog breeds for protection training include Rottweilers, MalinoisDutch Shepherd, Belgian shepherds, German shepherds, all kinds of Pinschers, sheepdogs, Yorkshire Terriers, or Australian Cattle.



    These particular breeds have an innate guarding instinct in them and can offer a high level of personal protection after training. Breeds such as the Rottweilers, German shepherds and Doberman have been specially bred to naturally work and protect.



    Without any special training these breeds offer instinctual protection to their masters/owners. An average person usually chooses the German Shepherd as a common choice for personal protection dog training. Other breeds have their strong points, but depending upon your own requirements, strengths and weaknesses as well as your handling experience you need to select a particular breed that can well adapt to your needs. Every breed has its good and bad points and these should be carefully weighed in, before deciding or selecting a protection dog for training.

    A dog trained for personal protection is not your average family loving pet, and if you are looking to train a dog for your own protection needs you might need to consider a few points:

    • Even though any dog from every breed can be trained, not every dog makes for a good watch dog or a personal protection guard dog. Guard dogs are specially trained to guard whatever they have been coached to safeguard.
    • Do not train your dog to be excessively mean and nasty. A perfect guard dog is one that can discern real dangers while acting upon the danger; not one that yaps, growls and snaps, without any rhyme or reason, at anybody and everybody.
    • If you have a dog that has been specially trained to protect you, it is important to remember that it might increase your liability risk, especially if the dog pounces on or bites someone. Possessing a highly trained dog for personal protection can invite lawsuits from people who have been unsuspectingly being bitten by your dog, just as having a loaded gun that is triggered off without warning causes harmful results.
    • Not all individuals can handle a highly trained dog for personal protection. It requires an experienced and well-versed handler to deal with highly trained dogs as dogs trained to protect can be hypersensitive and bite or leap on unsuspecting people at any time.
    • One important point to note is that, no matter how highly or specially trained a dog; it is bound to make mistakes. Dogs trained for personal protection are highly sensitive to every movement of their handler. It is quite likely that the trained dog might misinterpret playful laughter or shrieks as danger that needs to be addressed in the manner that the dog has been trained.
     
      Submitted on May 7, 2010