Home
  • Dog abscess tooth
  • Dog swollen eyes
  • Eye discharge in dogs
  • Dog eye ulcer
  • Dog eye bleeding
  • Dog lymphoma
  • Dog kennel cough
  • Dog kidney disease
  • Epilepsy in dogs
  • Heart murmur in dogs
  • Hypoglycemia in dogs
  • Tick infection in dogs
  • Tooth fracture in dogs
  • Urinary tract infection in dogs
  • Warts in dogs
  • Tapeworms in dog
  • Xylitol toxicity in dogs
  • Yeast infection in dogs
  • Congestive heart failure in dogs
  • Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in dogs
  • Mast cell tumor in dogs
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy in dogs
  • Perineal hernia in dogs
  • Diaphragmatic hernia in dogs
  • Umbilical hernia in dogs
  • Dog testicular cancer
  • Dog bone cancer
  • Dog stomach cancer
  • Dog chronic cough
  • Dog liver cancer
  • Dog lung cancer
  • Dog cataract
  • Dog depression
  • Dog hot spots
  • Dog eye tumor
  • Dog pneumonia
  • Dog leg sprain
  • Dog breathing problems
  • Dog back pain
  • Dog hepatitis
  • Dog thyroid problems
  • Dog thyroid treatments
  • Dog leg injury
  • Dog swollen glands
  • Dog spleen tumor
  • Dog addisons disease
  • Dog skin allergies
  • Dog health problems
  • Dog enlarged heart
  • Dog heart disease
  • Dog follicular conjunctivitis
  • Dog hemolytic anemia
  • Dog gestation period
  • Dog breast cancer
  • Dog cystitis
  • Dog prostate cancer
  • Dog allergies
  • Dog licks
  • Dog eczema
  • Dog coughing
  • Dog influenza
  • Dog renal failure
  • Dog bleeding gums
  • Dog brain tumor
  • Dog heartworms
  • Dog ear fungus
  • Cushings disease in dog
  • Colitis in dog
  • Dog arthritis treatment
  • Dog vomiting blood
  • Dog cold
  • Dog snoring
  • Dog stress
  • Dog bronchitis
  • Dog nausea
  • Dog skin cancer
  • Dog not eating
  • Dog dry skin
  • Hypothyroidism in dogs
  • Leptospirosis in dogs
  • Dog joint problems
  • Dog nail injury
  • Dog fungal infections
  • Dog ear smell
  • Dog coughing blood
  • Dog lymph problems
  • Dog paw injury
  • Dog ligament surgery
  • Dog cataract surgery
  • Dog illnesses
  • Dog knee surgery
  • Dog lice
  • Dog licking foot
  • Spondylosis in dogs
  • Underweight dog
  • Ticks on dogs
  • Fractures in dogs
  • Frostbite in dogs
  • Clostridial enteritis in dogs
  • Lymphoplasmacytic enteritis in dogs
  • Enteritis in dogs
  • Eosinophilic enteritis in dogs
  • Ehrlichiosis in dogs
  • Dog cherry eye
  • Brucellosis in dogs
  • Corneal diseases in dogs
  • Dog Asthma
  • Dog Rabies
  • Dog Tremors
  • Dog Skin Infection
  • Dog Uveitis
  • Dog Ehrlichiosis
  • Dog Entropion
  • Dog Type 2 Diabetes
  • Hemorrhagic Enteritis In Dogs
  • Viral Enteritis In Dogs
  • Dog Blepharitis
  • Brachycephalic Respiratory Syndrome
  • Bacterial Enteritis In Dogs
  • Dog Anus Bleeding
  • Dog Intestinal Blockage
  • Dog Intestinal Infection
  • Dog Torn Ligament
  • Dog Torn ACL
  • Dog Anus Smell
  • Dog Running In Sleep
  • Lyme Disease In Dogs
  • Blastomycosis In Dogs
  • Histoplasmosis In Dogs
  • Ringworm In Dogs
  • Aspergillosis In Dogs
  • Acid Reflux in Dogs
  • Allergic shock in dogs
  • Conjunctivitis in dogs
  • Dog blindness
  • Canine pyometra
  • Dog cancer
  • Dog swollen ear
  • Dog diabetes
  • Dog diarrhea
  • Dog eye health
  • Dog flu
  • Dog fungus
  • Dog gum disease
  • Dog hernia
  • Canine herpes
  • Dog leg injuries
  • Dog mange
  • Dog pregnancy problems
  • Dog runny nose
  • Dog skin health
  • Dog thyroid
  • Dog tumors
  • Dog upset stomach
  • Dog urinary incontinence
  • Dog vomiting
  • Dogs bad breath
  • Hair loss in dogs
  • Distemper dogs
  • Dog acne
  • Dog anemia
  • Chocolate poisoning in dogs
  • Aggression in dogs
  • Heart failure in dogs
  • Hip dysplasia in dogs
  • Hookworms in dogs
  • Kidney disease in dogs
  • Leukemia in dogs
  • Liver failure in dogs
  • Anal gland cancer in dogs
  • Canine aggression
  • Cardiomyopathy in dogs
  • Elbow dysplasia in dogs
  • Swollen lymph nodes in dogs
  • Enlarged spleen in dogs
  • Constipation in dogs
  • Degenerative joint disease in dogs
  • Dermatitis in dogs
  • Dog arthritis
  • Dog bloat
  • Excessive drooling dogs
  • Dogs with red eyes
  • Fear aggression in dogs
  • Gastrointestinal tumors in dogs
  • Hematuria in dogs
  • Elevated calcium in dogs
  • Luxating patella in dogs
  •   Pet Health And Care >>  Dog Health >>  Dog abscess tooth  
     

    Canine Tooth Abscess - Signs, Symptoms and Treatments of Dog Abscess Tooth

    An dog tooth abscess develops due to the bacterial infection of the 4th premolar tooth present at the back portion of the mouth; it is also known as the carnassial tooth.



    The carnassial tooth is one of the biggest teeth present in dogs; it has 3 roots and plays an important role in food intake.

    A carnassial abscess is an infection of the root of the tooth. The primary causes of dog tooth abscess are listed below:

    • Trauma from a blow to the tooth
    • Fighting
    • Chewing hard objects
    • Bacterial infection

    Out of the causes mentioned above, bacterial infections such as streptococcus, pseudomonas, and E. coli are the most common culprits of canine tooth abscess. Bacteria are either predominantly present in the root or reach it through the bloodstream. Once they become resident in the root, they start cutting off the blood connection to the tooth, which in turn leads to detachment of the tooth from the root.



    It also kills the surrounding tissue, resulting in the formation of pus or abscess due to the deposition of white blood cells. Abscess formation causes skin swelling near the eyes; there is also leakage of a fluid containing dead WBC.
    It is difficult for owners to recognize symptoms of the disease unless they consult a veterinarian.

    Dogs are among the most common of all household pets and are highly regarded not only for their sense of loyalty, but also for the fact that they can be easily trained to be kept as domestic pets. Moreover, the fact that dogs are available in different types, sizes and even temperaments means that you can always get exactly the type of companion that suits your personality. Caring for any pet means paying close attention to the animal’s behavior on a day to day basis to identify if the animal is in proper health. The fact that they are unable to communicate with humans means that the symptoms and signs of lethargy are what need to be picked up on, to find out if the animal is unwell.



    One of the biggest problems that a number of dog owners face is the fact that they tend to suffer in silence – only attempting to alert their owner to something being amiss when they have reached their threshold. As a result, identifying the presence of any medical ailment during the developmental phase is rather hard. Essentially, any dog abscess tooth signs and symptoms will start to develop as a result of bacterial infection.

    Symptoms of Tooth Abscess in Dogs


    A few indicators which can help you identify a tooth abscess in dogs are listed below:

    • Swollen nose: Could be an initial symptom so you should not overlook it.
    • Reduced diet: Dogs stop eating properly if they have pain in their teeth, so if there is any loss of appetite you should look into this.
    • Bad breath: You should check for dog bad breath which could well be the result of pus formation.
    • Bloody teeth: Look out for a colored tooth.
    • Nose scratching: You should watch for nose scratching as dogs do so when they feel pain.

    A veterinarian diagnoses a tooth abscess in dogs by checking for swelling and leakage near the eyes. An X-ray is required to see which tooth is affected.

    Some of the more prominent dog tooth abscess signs include a swollen nose, the dog scratching at his or her nose regularly, decreased food consumption, bad breath and swelling under the eyes. Because of the fact that the swelling just under the eye is one of the more common developments in a dog tooth abscess, a number of people tend to confuse this as being an eye complication.

    Tooth Abscess Treatment in Dogs


    For the treatment of dog gum disease like tooth abscess you should keep 3 things in mind:

    • Cost: You should be well aware of the treatment cost. Have a detailed discussion with the veterinarian about the process and cost involved.
    • Dog’s dental and mental health: You should always be aware of what your dog is going through.
    • The effect of a tooth loss: You should be ready for the after effects of the treatment. Some dogs eat normally after removal of the tooth, while others do not.

    There are two types of treatments for canine tooth abscess available: tooth extraction and root canal treatment (RCT).  Tooth extraction is a conventional way of treating a tooth abscess where the tooth has to be removed completely along with the surrounding tissues. This is a very painful process in which the tooth is cut in two halves and then extracted from the root. In the event that an infected part is not removed, it may cause an infection again. The root canal treatment is done using a procedure in which the tooth can be protected by scaling, removal of plaque, and polishing. This is a costly process and dogs need to have a complete course of antibiotics. A routine checkup is also advisable to avoid any further infection.

    Dog abscess tooth cost for treatment can be as expensive as dental treatment for humans and it can be significantly harder trying to find a good dental surgeon. The initial stages of tooth infection will commence when bacteria gains access to the root of the tooth either through the bloodline or through eating the soft tissue present in the gums. This prompts the dog’s immune system to send a number of white blood cells over to the affected area in an attempt to kill the infection. This leads to the development of ‘pus’ or as we can visibly see - a puppy ‘tooth abscess’.

    The carnassials are the 4th premolar teeth that are present in the back portion of the mouth. Carnaissial tooth infection occurs in very much the same way as infection in any other tooth. However, carnaissial tooth abscess treatment is extremely important and should be ignored because of the fact that the condition is known to lead to problems like blindness as well as additional tooth loss. Carnassials tooth abscess symptoms are similar to that of any other tooth being infected. Because of the fact that dental treatment for the dogs can be quite expensive, a number of people would rather choose to look for any dog abscess tooth home treatments that might be available. Prevention is better than cure and including large amounts of garlic as well as ginger in the animals regular foods will help prevent the development of the condition because of the fact that both of these food ingredients are known to be high in antifingal as well as antibacterial properties. Moreover, they are also known to be very potent anti septic foods. When dealing with carnaissial tooth infection, it is highly regarded that you do show the animal to your vet for an opinion before taking any steps to cure the condition on your own. If the condition has deteriorated significantly, you may be left with having to perform an extraction of the tooth.

     
      Submitted on September 30, 2011