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  •   Pet Health And Care >>  Cat Health >>  Cat arthritis  
     

    Cat Arthritis

    Just like us, our pets too can suffer from arthritis.



    Cat arthritis, for instance, is a fairly common condition in elderly cats. Like humans, the cartilaginous tissue on the joints of a cat may also wear out with age. When this happens, the cat’s bones begin to rub against each other causing immense pain and inflammation. Though arthritis in cats is quite painful, it is not manifested physically in any form and is therefore extremely difficult to identify.



    Only a vet can formally diagnose an animal with arthritis. You may however notice that your cat is not as active as it once used to be. The movements of your cat may appear stiff and as time passes, it may become more and more reluctant to go outdoors. Instead, the cat remains indoors most of the time and prefers sleeping.



    If the joints of the cat are especially raw and painful, it might yelp or cry when you try to pick it up or handle it.

    Cat arthritis causes are much like those in humans. The cartilage of the joints wears out with old age and excessive use. If the cat has received an injury in the limbs, the arthritic condition may become more severe. Just like in humans, in cats too arthritis remains an incurable disorder. The progression of arthritis in your pets can be controlled and managed. Your vet may prescribe some non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs to your cat in order to slow down the inflammation. These drugs also reduce the pain. Along with the cat arthritis treatments, cat owners can also make sure that their cat’s old age is easy. You may be able to help your pet cope up with the travails of old age. If you are concerned about your ageing cat that has arthritis, you can make your home more comfortable for the cat. For instance, you can install a kitty door close to the floor so that the cat may go outdoors without having to stress itself much. The cat’s bedding can also be placed on lower surfaces so that the cat can climb into it easily.
    The litter trays too should not have high sides, so that the cat can climb in easily. If your floors are tiled, waxed or polished, place mats on the areas where your cat generally roams. This will ease off the stress from the joints of the suffering cat.

     
      Submitted on May 19, 2010