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  •   Pet Health And Care >>  Cat Health >>  Cat bladder infection  
     

    Cat Bladder Problems:

    It is common for cats to get bladder or urinary tract infections.



    This is also known as cystitis. A cat bladder infection can occur due to many different reasons. It is important to get an accurate diagnosis of the cat’s condition because the treatment is, to a large extent, dependent on the cause of the infection.

    Cat bladder problems can occur due to a bacterial infection, stress, dehydration, and high quantities of minerals and ash in its diet.



    Cat bladder infection symptoms are easy to recognize. However, you may have to observe your cat closely if you feel that something is amiss. If you see your cat squatting or straining over the litter box, it is a very clear sign of a feline bladder infection. The cat may strain to urinate; however, the urine may be almost completely absent.



    The cat may also experience pain while trying to urinate and may emit cat sounds or whelp while straining. Sometimes, the cat may urinate outside the litter box, usually on a hard and cool surface.

    Feline bladder infections cause bloody urine, depression, and vomiting. The cat may repeatedly lick its genitals because of the pain. If you observe these symptoms in your cat, take it to a veterinarian immediately. It is important get cat bladder infection treatment right away or your cat may suffer badly. Your vet will examine the cat closely and check for bladder stones or blockage. These obstructions may be preventing the release of urine and therefore, causing pain and discomfort.

    The veterinarian will also collect a urine sample and a blood sample to check for infections. The doctor may relieve the pressure in the cat’s bladder by using a needle. The vet may also take X-rays of the pelvic area of the cat to check for stones and obstructions.
    Your doctor will check the urine for crystals, bacteria, and pH levels. The various blood chemistries can identify infections and the X-rays will show abnormalities and tumors, if any. The treatment for the infection would depend on the cause. Meanwhile, as the vet makes the final diagnosis, try and keep your cat’s stress levels low. During this period, do not travel with your cat or change its living space. A new person or pet at home may also cause stress to the cat. The cat may need to be rehydrated; so, make sure that it has plenty of water and liquids to drink.

     
      Submitted on March 2, 2010