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  •   Pet Health And Care >>  Cat Health >>  Cat ticks  
     

    Cat Ticks

    To maintain the good health of your cat and make sure that its fur remains healthy and clean, you should check the skin of your cat regularly.



    This is best done when grooming the cat and this is the best time to check the skin for presence of parasites like cat ticks and fleas.

    Parasites on your cat’s skin can multiply at an alarming rate. Therefore, if you are able to catch them early on, you can keep a check on their numbers and prevent an infestation.



    A cat tick is basically a fast multiplying parasite which attaches itself to the cat’s skin and sucks the cat’s blood to feed itself. These parasites exist at the expense of your cat and their continuous feeding on your cat can cause loss of nutrition and vitality. The coat becomes damaged and the cat may succumb to weakness caused by blood loss.



    If the infestation of cat ticks is not stopped, it can lead to the eventual death of your pet. Cat ticks usually leap on to the cat when it is wandering in tick infested areas like tall grasses. The tick has the ability to bite through the skin, burying its head into the skin and gorging on the blood. When the tick burrows itself like that, the cat can seem to get agitated. The cat tries to paw itself, trying to get rid of the itching sensation. However, the tick’s head is firmly in place, embedded into the cat’s skin. If you are able to remove the tick, but it leaves its head behind, this can cause a chronic infection. Cat tick treatment and removal is not simple and many people are not able to do it. This is where going to the vet can come in handy for cat tick treatment.
    There are a lot of cats that are allergic to tick bites. A cat tick bite could cause a lesion which becomes inflamed if the cat is allergic to the bite. To contain this infection, proper cat tick treatment has to be planned. Though cat tick control is most effectively done by grooming the cat regularly, there are instances when the ticks can escape onto the skin of the cat and bite.

    Tick bites are also responsible for the spread of Lyme disease. This is a serious disease which affects both humans and their pets. To avoid this disease, it is best to keep your pet clean and healthy.

     
      Submitted on August 6, 2010