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  •   Pet Health And Care >>  Cat Health >>  Cat mange  
     

    Cat Mange:

    Dogs are prone to the skin mites known as mange, but can cats get mange too? The answer is yes, they can get them too.



    Mange is a skin disease that cats occasionally suffer from. Cat mange is extremely contagious and can easily spread to other animals. Mange can prove fatal for a cat if is it is left untreated for long. Cat mange causes due to microscopic mites that have the ability to burrow themselves under the skin of the cat.



    These mites suck your pet’s blood and can cause infections or allergic reactions.
    There are various different types of mites which cause mange. Each of these different species has specific symptoms. If you have a litter of cats and one of them has mange, the others should also receive treatment.



    Some of the commonly found mange are feline scabies, cheyletiella mange, demodectic mange, sarcopactic mange, and otodectic mange. Each of these creates different sets of symptoms and has a different diagnosis and treatment. Mange is not something that can be easily diagnosed. However, it is very easy to spot feline mange. The initial symptoms include shabby and patchy fur with irritated and scabby skin underneath. Your pet may experience sudden weight loss. Brown marks may begin to appear on the nose and the ears. There may be occasional discharge from the ear. This discharge is usually dark in color. The ear remains crusty, and scabbed patches begin to appear on the neck and the head.

    There is excessive shedding because of which the fur becomes extremely thin. Scabs and patches begin to form because of excessive scratching. There may also be a loss of appetite and your pet may visibly suffer from dehydration.
    Once the vet takes a look at your cat, he will be able to determine whether or not feline mange is a possibility. He will assess the overall condition of your pet and whether or not she has lost excessive amounts of weight or has become dehydrated.

    For a diagnosis of cat mange, the doctor will ask for a skin sample that is called a biopsy. When viewed under a microscope, mites can be seen and the doctor can determine which kind of mites your pet is infected from.
    The treatment of mange depends largely on the type of mange your pet is suffering from. Medicated shampoos, oral medicines and topical ointments are usually used to get rid of mange.

     
      Submitted on December 8, 2009