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  •   Pet Health And Care >>  Cat Health >>  Cat teeth problems  
     

    Cat Dental Problems:

    Cats are carnivorous animals and therefore, have sharp teeth well suited for biting and tearing off flesh in order to eat.



    If cats lose their teeth, they are not able to get nutrition because they cannot chew. Therefore, as a responsible pet owner, it is your responsibility to make sure that your cat’s teeth remain healthy. You should check your cat’s teeth regularly to make sure that they are clean and healthy. Though there are no specific cat teeth problems, checking the teeth regularly can help determine if the cat needs any medical attention.



    Teeth are very important to cats. If they lose their teeth, they have no way of eating and receiving nutrition.

    Some of the common teeth problems in cats are:

    • Plaque: Cats do not have cavities, however, the buildup of food along the teeth and gums can cause plaque. If the cat’s teeth are brushed routinely, the formation and accumulation of plaque can be checked and your pet’s teeth can be kept healthier for a longer period of time.
    • Tartar: When plaque is ignored for some time, the cat may develop tartar.



      Tartar occurs typically when the plaque becomes harder. Tartar forms a permanent coating on the teeth and is extremely difficult to remove. A build up of tartar is a typical precursor to gingivitis in which the gums get inflamed. Tartar can also cause inflammation of mucous membranes. This is known as stomatitis.

    Other periodontal diseases may stem out of plaque and tartar. Pockets of bacteria that form inside the mouth are extremely dangerous and irreversible. Such a periodontal disease can be extremely painful. Periodontal disease can cause infections in the gums, formation of abscesses, decay, and loss of teeth. As the bacteria continues to grow, it may get transferred to the blood through the mouth, causing further damage and infections to the cat’s internal organs.

    The first indication of cat tooth problems is a change in behavior. If the cat appears to be more aggressive and irritable, it may an indication of a dental problem. Dejection, depression and reclusive behaviors are also an indication of dental problems. The cat may be suffering from halitosis and may end up injuring their gums frequently. If you observe your cat closely, you may see it getting excited about the prospect of feeding but as soon as it tries to eat, it pushes away food and leaves.
    If you keep checking your cat’s mouth regularly, you may be able to avoid tooth and gum diseases by taking timely action.

     
      Submitted on December 15, 2009